Like Three Blind Mice

Last night, Hubby and I went out with another couple to a restaurant called Epic Chophouse in Mooresville.  (Located in the heart of historic downtown Mooresville, for those who live in the Lake Norman area.)

The restaurant is located in a historic part of town.  We heard the food is amazing!  Hubby and I joked how we felt like young, hip people going out on a school night, having drinks, conversation, and being with friends.  We didn’t feel like old moms and dads who would normally, at that time of night, be in our pajamas and slippers, getting ready to put our kids to bed, then ourselves.   That is, until the menu arrived.

This is what Epic Chophouse’s websites says:  Epic Chophouse offers fine dining in an elegant and comfortable setting. Our great selection of steak, seafood, other fine foods and wine has quickly made us one of the most sought-after dining choices in the Lake Norman region of North Carolina. Our experienced chefs can please the most discriminating palate and our friendly staff strives to give you wonderful dining experience.  Come on over for a relaxing night of great food and drinks!

Sounds great, huh?  We have discriminating palates.  We were ready for a wonderful dining experience!  And there we were.  All of us with huge menus in front of our faces, excited to see what we were going to eat.  Then we put down our menus and looked at each other.  We could see each other.  We could not see our menus!  Only one of us had reading glasses on.  Two of us did not bring any.  And one of us just gloated because he could read the menu just fine.  Yay for him. (Insert sarcasm.)  The rest of us, however, were like 3 blind mice!

A couple of us tried to magnify the menu with our cell phones.  That didn’t work.  It just made us look like idiots.  No one had arms long enough to read without glasses.  I tried to hold the menu away from my friend so she could see it, but I nearly fell off my chair trying to get far enough away.  All of our efforts was making us look ridiculous.  We ended up passing the one pair of glasses around the table to read the menu.  The waitress came back twice to see if we were ready to order.  Sorry, not yet.  Still passing the glasses!  It took 20 minutes.  So much for cool and hip!

Despite this sad moment when none of us old fogies could read the menu, we had a fantastic time!  The food and drinks were yummy.  The company was great!  And the decor gave me decorating ideas!  Gotta love that!  ;)

For my Friends and Neighbors… Here is a little about the restaurant:

First a little history…  At the time Mooresville was founded, a saloon sat on the current site of Epic Chophouse. The saloon was torn down in 1888 to make way for a modern dry goods store named the Rankin Store. The store was divided into 5 sections, with a portion of the current main dining room used for cloth, notions, shoes and general merchandise. The bar area was used as the mens department, and the area over the main dining room was used as the women’s and children’s department. A millinery department was located at the rear of the women’s department; where only the finest and latest ladies hat styles were crafted. The section now occupied as the banquet room served as the merchandise unpacking and pricing area.

The present day kitchen housed feed and seed, and there was at one time a mezzanine used to display rugs and provide storage. The large octagon floor area featured an opening called a well. This allowed light and heat to penetrate the upper floor while providing better circulation during hot summer months. The original building contained a rope elevator furnished by the J.B. Westbrook Company of Danville, Virginia. In 1907, this was replaced with an electric elevator built by the Park Elevator Company of Charlotte. A 21st century environmentally friendly elevator was installed in 2005. There are three centuries of elevators within 30 feet! The founder of the Rankin Store died in 1906, and the store was reorganized as W.W. Rankin Company, which stayed in operation until the 1950s. The building then became Morrow Brothers Furniture Company until around 1980.

Today, this wonderful historic building is home to Epic Chophouse… an upscale dining experience with a “chophouse-classic American style” menu.  Epic Chophouse is owned by Jim Morasso, Larry Sponaugle and Rick Mack. Both Mr. Sponaugle and Mr. Morasso have been in the restaurant business for over two decades, and Mr. Mack is an entrepreneur as well with RDM Architecture and SynergyOne in Davidson. The Executive Chef is Jon Spencer, CEC and Sous Chef is Tim Chung. Epic Chophouse offers a variety of steaks, chops, seafood, pasta and some Southern specialties, and also has an intimate bar area for relaxing with friends.