DIY Projects & Decor

Recovering an Armchair

 Recovering an Armchair (reblog)

Woohoo!  Finally finished one of the projects on my  “almost done” list!

This is the armchair I bought at the antique show a couple of weeks ago.  It was in good shape, but it needed a paint redo to freshen it up and it definitely new fabric.

Chair before
New fabric

It took me five fabric stores before I found the perfect fabric.  It’s hard to shop for something you can only see in your head!  ha!

Cream chalk paint

I bought a quart of Annie Sloan chalk paint.  I have been hearing and reading about it a lot lately.  It’s suppose to cover furniture without prep work.  That’s all I needed to hear!

Distressed paint

After two coats of paint (and it dries really fast!)  I sanded the edges a bit for a distressed finish.  I’m a novice at this, so I’m just winging it here.  The paint calls for a wax finish.  I wanted to buy clear wax but after searching the world over (a little exaggeration), I settled for a light “natural” wax.  It worked, but I would have preferred clear.  I looked up instructions for using Annie Sloan chalk paint and chuckled at the very easy and straight to the point directions…

The steps in brief
“Paint, paint, wax, wipe. Sand then wax then wipe (dark wax at this point with the clear wax).  Finally polish the piece the next day for a mellow sheen.”  How’s that for simple???  Ha!

covering old fabrics

Before I started recovering the chair, I had to take off the double weld trim.  (Not shown, it’s in the garbage.)  It was done in the same material as the rest of the chair.  I didn’t take the original fabric off the chair before recovering because it’s attached with a million staples.  After pulling off the trim, I had enough of pliers!  I used the original fabric as a guide for doing the corners and rounded edges.

Getting there!

I used a staple gun to attach the fabric to the chair.  Some places I used a little hot glue when I ran out of hands to hold everything.

Double cording

Here is how the double weld cording looks on the chair.  I looked at quite a few fabric stores for ready-made trim to use around the edges.  It never occurred to me to put double weld cording back on the chair.  I didn’t know how and it looked complicated.  NOT SO!  Oh my gosh!  It was so easy and soooo cheap to do.  I had left over fabric and spend $10.00 on the cord.  Ready made trim would have cost me around $30.00.  I went to google for directions and this is the blog I used for directions… Centsational Girl.

Gluing trim
Spatula

The back of the chair just had fabric on it.  It was pushed up into the frame of the chair.  I folded over the edge of the fabric and glued it on.  I used  a spatula to stuff it in the frame.  Spatulas aren’t just for cooking, ya know!

blue chair before and after

Ta Da!  It’s finished.  Not too bad for a fly by the seat of your pants kind of girl!

 

Linking to:

The Shady Porch

Framing a Bathroom Mirror

I’m taking some time off to spent with my family.  While I’m away, I will be re-sharing a few of my favorite DIY projects.  This one is “Framing a Bathroom Mirror”.

My BFF Kerry, and I just finished framing her bathroom mirror.  It’s definitely one of  my favorite DIY project so far!   I have seen moulding put on builder grade mirrors before, but we took this one a little farther.  What a difference it made in that room!

Here’s a tutorial on how we did it:  (The total cost of the project and the supplies we used are listed at the bottom of the page.)

First, we measured and miter cut the trim (measure TWICE and cut once!) then taped it into place to check out the fit.  There’s nothing like miter cuts coming together perfectly!  A hand miter box would have worked fine, but I used an electric saw for this project.  (Don’t forget to get your level out and check that each piece is straight (level).

framing a bathroom mirror with moulding and tile

framing a bathroom mirror with moulding and tile

The mirror is attached to the wall with clips, which would not allow the trim to lay flat against the mirror.  Not wanting to remove the clips and adhere the mirror directly to the wall, we marked the back of the trim where the clips would be and chiseled out a piece of wood.  This was done (carefully) by scoring the wood with a utility knife and then using a chisel and hammer to tap out the pieces of wood.  It worked great!

framing a bathroom mirror with moulding and tile

Almost there!

Next, we glued the back of the trim and put it directly on the mirror.  The frame alone looked good, so we could have stopped there.  But why? ;   )

framing a bathroom mirror with moulding and tile

Tiling went surprisingly fast.  Kerry put a line of glue on the mirror and I peeled off each tile to give to her.  We glued them side by side so no grouting was necessary.)  This time I didn’t count how  many tiles we put on the mirror by hand, one by one by one.  I didn’t want to know!

Framing bathroom mirror with moulding and tile

Once the tiles were dry (we waited impatiently over the weekend), the small trim piece of moulding was measured, miter cut and glued to the mirror.  I don’t have a “before” picture of the moulding, but it’s just a thin decorative moulding from Home Depot.  It finishes off the tile perfectly!  (FYI, Kerry had the outer moulding and the inner moulding painted before we started the project.)

Framed bathroom mirror

My pictures don’t do the mirror justice. It looks amazing!

framing a bathroom mirror

Finished!

A mirror like this would cost hundreds of dollars in a store.

Here is the breakdown of what was spent:  Total $51.91

Household Goop Tube  $4.57
1/2 inch mosaic tile 8 at $2.94 (23.52)
8 ft., 1/2″ molding trim 2 at $3.98 (7.96)
8 ft., 1 1/4″ molding trim 2 at $7.93 (15.86)

The home improvement stores have so many beautiful tiles.  The design possibilities are countless.  (Yes, my mind is spinning!)  I loved this project so much, I’m going to put all my ugly builders mirrors BACK up!  I hope you enjoyed.

The KEGerator

Okay men… Here is a DIY project that will make you happy on Father’s Day. :D  It’s called a KEGerator!

What is this Keg thing, you ask?  It’s a do-it-yourself keg in a refrigerator with a tap handle on the outside for easy filler-ups!  The Hubbs of my friend, Carol, set this system up.  While I don’t want this compliment to go to her Hubbs head, it is rather brilliant! ;)

My Hubby about fell on the floor when he opened the refrigerator in their garage and saw this.  I don’t know if there is one of these things in our future, but the happiness I heard when he yelled “Laurie, you really gotta see this!!” makes me think it a possibility!

If you Google KEGerator, you will find companies that sell the supplies, including Home Depot.  The prices range quite a bit, but this particular set up cost only $65.00 (Keg not included).

kegerator

Keg in the Frig

Kegerator

Tap handle on the side of the frig for easy filling up. ;)

Kegerator

The KEGerator

SAMSUNG

 

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